Bukati School-boy

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PHOTO GALLERY Page 24 - 2010
Permaculture

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One of the Bukati-Project Goals is:

Establish community-led projects to sustain the program

  • Develop school projects that will generate income to enable the community to support their children without outside assistance in six - seven years time.
May 12, 2010 - Permaculture Update
Dear friends and family
The permaculture project that Michael Nickels designed in Nov. 2009 is absolutely amazing. It encompasses the school compound and the 11 acres of land we purchased for the school last year.

The water capture system of swales re-routes the rainfall from the entire school compound to the new banana groves, eucalyptus forest and finally to the fish pond. Yesterday, in the flash flood, the system was really put to the test. The water flowed perfectly toward the pond, rather than flooding the yard and running off onto the road. We watched the fish jumping, as the student who is responsible for feeding the fish sprinkled tiny dried fish on the water's surface.

Large lush green leaves of banana trees, planted as tiny shoots in November, now flap in the wind like an elephant's ears. The trees that Peter planted behind the school, in what most of us would consider wasted space, are now 10 feet tall - growing so well with the water that runs off the school's roof. Together with the bananas trees, there are also espandia (sp?) trees that will be used as fodder for the cattle. They will provide additional protein to enhance milk production. Already, the trees are providing welcome shade to the classrooms, keeping the temperatures more tolerable for learning. Some espania are already producing seeds that will be harvested for the tree nursery.

There is very sturdy fencing around each of the 3 pieces of land and some sections have been planted with kia apple trees that will provide a thorny barrier plus fruit. The new land is planted with maize and beans for the lunch program and rice. The school will harvest the rice to sell as seeds. Where the swales have been dug, the maize is growing much taller than in other sections. It is a vivid, living example of the benefit of water capture.

This project is making the goal of sustainability a reality


Below:  Photos of the Water-Capture System

The water capture system of swales re-routes the rainfall from the entire school compound to the new banana groves, eucalyptus forest and finally to the fish pond. Yesterday, in the flash flood, the system was really put to the test. The water flowed perfectly toward the pond, rather than flooding the yard and running off onto the road.

 

Below:  Photos of the trees surrounding the school

Large lush green leaves of banana trees, planted as tiny shoots in November, now flap in the wind like an elephant's ears. The trees that Peter planted behind the school, in what most of us would consider wasted space, are now 10 feet tall - growing so well with the water that runs off the school's roof. Together with the bananas trees, there are also espandia (sp?) trees that will be used as fodder for the cattle. They will provide additional protein to enhance milk production. Already, the trees are providing welcome shade to the classrooms, keeping the temperatures more tolerable for learning. Some espania are already producing seeds that will be harvested for the tree nursery.

Above:  Trees lining the school, beyond the rice-field.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below:  Photos of some of their crops.

There is very sturdy fencing around each of the 3 pieces of land and some sections have been planted with kia apple trees that will provide a thorny barrier plus fruit. The new land is planted with maize and beans for the lunch program and rice. The school will harvest the rice to sell as seeds. Where the swales have been dug, the maize is growing much taller than in other sections. It is a vivid, living example of the benefit of water capture.

Above:  Rice field
Above:  Maize (corn) crop, with irrigation ditch being dug to the left.
Above: Maize to the left, and rice to the right.
Above: the irrigation ditch, watering the corn.
Above: The fence protects their crop
Above: What's that tucked away in the bush?
Check the answer on the right-side.

Above: Closeup of the newest project at Bukati - the bee hive.

The bees went to the hive the first day it was put out.
Once JB is certified as a bee keeper, he will be given a bee keeper's hat and coverall so that he can remove the honey from the hive. It takes 3, one week courses at an agricultural university to be certified. Once he has the certification, they will set out another 4 bee hives. There is expected to be a good market for honey in the area.

 

 

 

 

Above:  JB is he is the teacher who has assumed responsibilty for the whole permaculture project at the school. We are sponsoring him to take a bee keeping course so that he will be the one to harvest the honey.
Above: rice field growing nicely.

 

Below: Bukati school still has the animals to rely on as well.  Cattle, pigs, goats, chickens. 

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Updated March 30, 2011